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March 05, 2012

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Phil Johnson

That's the type of response I'd expect from an artist. The decision will really be up to her. Lord knows my girlfriend puts up with a load of garbage.

I was just remarking, while watching The Voice, about how every performer says, "This is my big chance." "This is my last chance." "This will change my whole life." I'd like Andrew WK to tell them to knock it off and take the opportunities that come, but don't hang everything on one possibility. Quitting is the only sure sign of failure.

David C Weaver

You have to do music or art for the sake of music or art because you like to create. I write songs and enjoy doing it and recording all the parts myself. I wrote an anthem for a university and sold it to them. To me its an ongoing process, the song I sold was a fluke, just when I was seriously starting to write songs three years ago. Now that I have learned the recording process I am buying better equipment to rerecord my songs and a few I have waiting. My dream is to just make a living,I also am well educated and make good money teaching overseas, yes I agree never let go of your dream but temper it with common sense. I played in bar bands for years and made money, I like what I am doing now much more, my second wife is an artist and she encouraged me to pick up my music again.

Pål Erik

Agree with Andrew, but i think anyones dream of becoming a rockstar is ridiculous. but i think a dream of becoming a successful musician is a much better dream. fuck stardom and fame.

Ted Hansen of Ted Hansen and the Paper Suns

Dreaming of stardom ? That can be a problem. Living to be creative and striving to perfect your vision of what your potential could be is more of what he could hope to aspire for. Stardom and even the need just to feed yourself may lead one to compromise and too often disillusionment with what we started out loving. I've been very happy surrounding myself with creative inspiring people and even after 35 years am still in love with making music.

Michael

Well said andrew,you know the funny thing about this world is,it was built on a dream and even to this day,the things we see and touch came from someone's dream,the difference is,they put in the work and time to making it happen and they never gave up,so why should this guy who wants to be a rock star be any different,its a better feeling to say at lease he will die trying than to say he gave up cuz of someone who did'nt believe in him and he lived a misarable life working some where that he can't stand......People if the person can't love and accept you for you,then find the person who will and it will be a longer and bigger pay off.

Michael Crowe

"Stardom" may not actually be this guy's dream. Maybe just being a successful musician, or even a hobbyist because it makes him happy, is what he wants. She's just too absorbed by an idea to see it for what it is.

Michael Mancuso

The question really changes when you have financial obligations. If you can't make enough money to fulfill your obligations to a child, it might be time to think about taking up a career that provides steady income or take up a side job. Most people can pursue a life of music while working a non-artist job. At some point you have to decide whether you'd like to be a successful artist or a successful parent. Sorry, but that's just life.

Vic Stathopoulos

We all have dreams - musicians and non-musicians. If you love and respect this person you will not try to change him. You need to love who they really are and not what you want them to be.

Kraig Dean Roberts

Being a successful musician on any level is all one can strive for. Entertainment in general is rarely like a regular career where you can literally get hired based on your resume, your degree and obvious skill in one's chosen "profession". The old addage of having something to fall back on I now know is just common sense; you most often are relying on three to four other musicians to stay the course with you, to love your music and vision enough to tough it out on both the personal / band member level and the business side, which at some point should no longer be the band's concern i.e. hiring a manager if you have reached that level. But the club scene is unforgiving and clubs today do not promote a band which in turn promotes the club; no, sorry, these days you have to practically micro-manage the club and the band. So a girlfriend or wife is only going to see what a load of crap you put yourself through only to come home at 2:00am with no money for sharing a stage with seven other bands. Do it for fun or you'll go insane and so will she. Keep you day job until you get to that place where you can afford to take a big risk - if it all falls apart, at least you tried.

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